SCIENCE JOURNAL

High Fat Diet Increases HDL & Weight Loss

Comparative study of the effects of a 1-year dietary intervention of a low-carbohydrate diet versus a low-fat diet on weight and glycemic control in Type-2 diabetes.

APR 14, 2009

Written by Nichola J. Davis, Nora Tomuta, Clyde Schechter, Carmen R. Isasi, C.J. Segal-Isaacson, Daniel Stein, Joel Zonszein and Judith Wylie-Rosette

Click to view the full journal here.

 01


OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of a 1-year intervention with a low-carbohydrate and a low-fat diet on weight loss and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

 02


RESEARCH DESIGN & METHODS

This study is a randomized clinical trial of 105 overweight adults with type 2 diabetes. Primary outcomes were weight and A1C. Secondary outcomes included blood pressure and lipids. Outcome measures were obtained at 3, 6, and 12 months.

 03


RESULTS

The greatest reduction in weight and A1C occurred within the first 3 months. Weight loss occurred faster in the low-carbohydrate group than in the low-fat group (P = 0.005), but at 1 year a similar 3.4% weight reduction was seen in both dietary groups. There was no significant change in A1C in either group at 1 year. There was no change in blood pressure, but a greater increase in HDL was observed in the low-carbohydrate group (P = 0.002).

 04


CONCLUSIONS

Among patients with type 2 diabetes, after 1 year a low-carbohydrate diet had effects on weight and A1C similar to those seen with a low-fat diet. There was no significant effect on blood pressure, but the low-carbohydrate diet produced a greater increase in HDL cholesterol.